Ruminal in situ degradability of forage components and in vitro organic matter digestibility of warm-season grasses treated with calcium oxide

Francine M. Ciriaco, Darren D. Henry, Romina Beierbach, Tessa M. Schulmeister, Martin Ruiz-Moreno, Mariana E. Garcia-Ascolani, Federico Podversich, Jose C.B. Dubeux, Nicolas Dilorenzo

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Abstract

An experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of CaO on ruminal in situ degradability (RISD) of forage components and in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD) of warm-season forages. Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum; BH) or Tifton 85 bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.; BM) hay were stored in 20-L buckets in two consecutive years (n = 4/treatment) as follows: 1) untreated dry BH or BM (DH); 2) hydrated BH or BM stored for 7 d (W7); 3) hydrated BH or BM stored for 14 d (W14); 4) hydrated BH or BM + 5% [dry matter (DM) basis] CaO stored for 7 d (CO5-7); 5) hydrated BH or BM + 5% (DM basis) CaO stored for 14 d (CO5-14); and 6) hydrated BH or BM + 10% (DM basis) CaO stored for 14 d (CO10). With exception of the dry treatment (DH), tap water was added to forages under the remaining treatments to reach a DM concentration of 50%. Ruminal in situ degradability of DM, organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and acid detergent fiber (ADF) of BH and BM was determined for 24, 48, and 72 h in two ruminally cannulated steers consuming BH. Data were analyzed as a randomized block design using bucket as the experimental unit. The model included the fixed effect of treatment and the random effect of year. Concentration of NDF was reduced (P < 0.001) when BH and BM were treated with 10% and 5% CaO and compared with DH. However, only CO10 promoted a reduction (P = 0.007) in ADF concentration of BH, whereas CO10 and CO5, regardless of storage length, reduced (P ≤ 0.006) ADF concentration of BM, when compared with DH. At all ruminal incubation time points, a treatment effect (P < 0.001) was observed on RISD of DM, OM, CP, NDF, and ADF of BH and BM, where all treatments containing CaO promoted greater degradability when compared with DH, W7, and W14, which did not differ (P > 0.05). Ruminal degradability of forage components was greatest (P < 0.05) for CO10, followed by CO5-7 and CO5-14, which did not differ (P > 0.05). In vitro organic matter digestibility was increased (P < 0.001) in both BH and BM when CaO was applied and compared to DH. Treatment of BH and BM with CaO seems to be an effective method of promoting increased digestibility of forage components, including fiber fractions, when applied at 5% of the forage DM with potential additional benefits to BH when applied at 10%.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbertxab204
JournalTranslational Animal Science
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2021

Keywords

  • alkali treatment
  • degradability
  • digestibility
  • fiber fractions
  • warm-season forages

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