Role of chemical dynamics simulations in mass spectrometry studies of collision-induced dissociation and collisions of biological ions with organic surfaces

Ana Martin Somer, Veronica MacAluso, George L. Barnes, Li Yang, Subha Pratihar, Kihyung Song, William L. Hase, Riccardo Spezia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this article, a perspective is given of chemical dynamics simulations of collisions of biological ions with surfaces and of collision-induced dissociation (CID) of ions. The simulations provide an atomic-level understanding of the collisions and, overall, are in quite good agreement with experiment. An integral component of ion/surface collisions is energy transfer to the internal degrees of freedom of both the ion and the surface. The simulations reveal how this energy transfer depends on the collision energy, incident angle, biological ion, and surface. With energy transfer to the ion's vibration fragmentation may occur, i.e. surface-induced dissociation (SID), and the simulations discovered a new fragmentation mechanism, called shattering, for which the ion fragments as it collides with the surface. The simulations also provide insight into the atomistic dynamics of soft-landing and reactive-landing of ions on surfaces. The CID simulations compared activation by multiple "soft" collisions, resulting in random excitation, versus high energy single collisions and nonrandom excitation. These two activation methods may result in different fragment ions. Simulations provide fragmentation products in agreement with experiments and, hence, can provide additional information regarding the reaction mechanisms taking place in experiment. Such studies paved the way on using simulations as an independent and predictive tool in increasing fundamental understanding of CID and related processes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2-24
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2020

Keywords

  • Chemical dynamics simulations
  • Collision-induced dissociation
  • Surface-induced dissociation
  • Theoretical modeling

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Role of chemical dynamics simulations in mass spectrometry studies of collision-induced dissociation and collisions of biological ions with organic surfaces'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this