Rodent populations after a large wildfire in California chaparral and coastal sage scrub

Dylan W. Schwilk, Jon E. Keeley

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rodent populations were sampled at sites in California chaparral and coastal sage scrub six months after wildfire. Sites adjacent to unburned brush were compared with sites in the center of large burned areas. Eight species of rodents were captured. Species of Peromyscus were the most abundant, 40.2% of individuals captured; followed by Neotoma (32.4%), Chaetodipus (20.3%), and Dipodomys (7.0%). Peromyscus maniculatus accounted for 32.8% of all individuals and was captured most frequently at sites in the center of large burns. Neotoma lepida which accounted for 31.3% of individuals captured, was trapped most commonly at the periphery of burns. Several species showed contrasting distribution patterns in coastal sage scrub and in chaparral. Coastal sage scrub sites had the highest estimates of rodent populations. Species diversity varied widely among sites.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)480-483
Number of pages4
JournalSouthwestern Naturalist
Volume43
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1998

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