Risks of excess iodine intake in Ghana: current situation, challenges, and lessons for the future

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Abstract

In Ghana, iodine deficiency was first reported in 1994 among 33% of the population. A nationwide Universal Salt<br>Iodization (USI) program plus other complementary interventions were subsequently implemented as a response.<br>Our paper reviews the current risks of excess iodine status in Ghana and identifies policy and research gaps. A<br>mixedmethods review of 12 policies and institutional reports and 13 peer-reviewed articles was complemented with<br>consultations with 23 key informants (salt producers and distributors, food processors, regulatory agency officials,<br>and healthcare providers) purposively sampled between May and August 2017. The findings show a strong policy<br>environment indicated by regulations on food and salt fortification (Act 851), including the USI regulation.However,<br>currently, only a third of Ghanaian households use adequately iodized salt. Recent evidence shows that voluntarily<br>fortified processed foods (including condiments) supply a considerable
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 29 2018

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