Resiliency patterns suggest spirituality supports lower distress in undergraduate students who identify as an LGBTQ+ person of color

Joseph M. Currin, Douglas Knutson, Dillon J. Federici, Julie M. Koch, Paul B. Ingram

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

People with multiple minoritized identities, such as those that identify as a minoritized sexual orientation and/or gender identity and as a Person of Color (POC), report higher levels of distress that may result from complex systems and various sources of discrimination. Resilience is an adaptive response to oppression that enables marginalized communities to resist the impact of discrimination and rejection. The current study surveyed levels of resilience, distress, and elements of resiliency and how they differed among emerging adults who identify as non-LGBTQ+ POC; LGBTQ+ POC; LGBTQ+ White people; and non-LGBTQ+ White people. Data were collected from 1,194 participants at three large universities in the United States. A multivariate analysis of variance was conducted that yielded significant differences by groups. Post-hoc analysis revealed significant differences among the measured variables of interest. Of note, individuals who identified as LGBTQ+ POC reported lower distress and higher resilience, hope, and significantly higher spiritual support when compared to LGBTQ+ White participants. These results highlight how individuals who possess multiple minoritized identities may experience buffers to rather than additive minority stress, and spirituality may play a key role in this resilience. Implications for psychologists and helping professionals are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • LGBTQ+
  • intersectionality
  • people of color
  • queer
  • resilience
  • spirituality

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