Repair of longitudinal joints and cracks

Dar Hao Chen, Taylor Crawford, David W. Fowler, James Jirsa, Megan Stringer, David Whitney, Moon Won

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Longitudinal cracking and longitudinal joint separations are commonly observed distresses in concrete pavements. The Texas Department of Transportation instituted a research project to determine the causes and to recommend repair methods. Repair methods that are generally recommended to repair cracks and joints are (1) cross stitching; (2) slot stitching; and (3) stapling. Finite element modeling was performed to determine the stress distribution in the concrete for each method when a truck tire load was placed on one side of the joint. Assuming no interlock between joint faces, the slot stitching model produced the lowest stress and cross stitching produced the highest stress, when the load was placed on the upper end of the diagonal bar. Cross stitching is recommended for repairing narrow cracks and slot stitching is recommended for wider cracks and joints.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNew Technologies in Construction and Rehabilitation of Portland Cement Concrete Pavement and Bridge Deck Pavement
Pages119-124
Number of pages6
Edition196
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event2009 GeoHunan International Conference - New Technologies in Construction and Rehabilitation of Portland Cement Concrete Pavement and Bridge Deck Pavement - Changsha, Hunan, China
Duration: Aug 3 2009Aug 6 2009

Publication series

NameGeotechnical Special Publication
Number196
ISSN (Print)0895-0563

Conference

Conference2009 GeoHunan International Conference - New Technologies in Construction and Rehabilitation of Portland Cement Concrete Pavement and Bridge Deck Pavement
CountryChina
CityChangsha, Hunan
Period08/3/0908/6/09

Keywords

  • Concrete pavements
  • Cracking
  • Joints
  • Rehabilitation

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