Relationship between river fragment length and persistence of two imperiled great plains cyprinids

Gene R. Wilde, Aaron C. Urbanczyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

We used logistic regression to model the persistence of two imperiled pelagic-spawning cyprinids, sharpnose shiner Notropis oxyrhynchus and smalleye shiner N. buccula, endemic to the Brazos and Wichita Rivers, Texas, USA. There was a significant positive relationship between persistence and river fragment length. Mean length of river fragments in which sharpnose shiner or smalleye shiner still occur was significantly greater (599 ± 27 km) than the mean length of fragments from which these species were absent (187 ± 20 km). Persistence of both species appears to depend on the presence of river fragments long enough to allow spawned ova and swim-up fry time to develop and move out of the current into the backwater areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)445-451
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Freshwater Ecology
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Keywords

  • Brazos River
  • Notropis buccula
  • Notropis oxyrhynchus
  • conservation
  • pelagic-spawning

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