Reciprocal regulation between nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism and abscisic acid and stress response pathways in Arabidopsis

Yechun Hong, Zhen Wang, Huazhong Shi, Juanjuan Yao, Xue Liu, Fuxing Wang, Liang Zeng, Zhi Xie, Jian Kang Zhu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is an essential coenzyme that has emerged as a central hub linking redox equilibrium and signal transduction in living organisms. The homeostasis of NAD is required for plant growth, development, and adaption to environmental cues. In this study, we isolated a chilling hypersensitive Arabidopsis thaliana mutant named qs-2 and identified the causal mutation in the gene encoding quinolinate synthase (QS) critical for NAD biosynthesis. The qs-2 mutant is also hypersensitive to salt stress and abscisic acid (ABA) but resistant to drought stress. The qs-2 mutant accumulates a reduced level of NAD and over-accumulates reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ABA-hypersensitivity of qs-2 can be rescued by supplementation of NAD precursors and by mutations in the ABA signaling components SnRK2s or RBOHF. Furthermore, ABA-induced over-accumulation of ROS in the qs-2 mutant is dependent on the SnRK2s and RBOHF. The expression of QS gene is repressed directly by ABI4, a transcription factor in the ABA response pathway. Together, our findings reveal an unexpected interplay between NAD biosynthesis and ABA and stress signaling, which is critical for our understanding of the regulation of plant growth and stress responses.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1008892
JournalPLoS Genetics
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2020

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