Rater positive and negative mood predispositions as predictors of performance ratings of ratees in simulated and real organizational settings: Evidence from US and Israeli samples

Yitzhak Fried, Ariel S. Levi, Haim Ailan Ben-David, Robert B. Tiegs, Naftali Avital

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Laboratory research shows that raters who experience positive mood evaluate others more favourably, while raters who experience negative mood provide less favourable ratings. Based on these findings it was hypothesized that in more realistic work situations, raters who are high on positive mood predisposition would provide higher job performance ratings of ratees, while raters who are high on negative mood predisposition would provide lower job performance ratings. These hypotheses were tested by examining performance ratings from two sources: a realistic organizational simulation conducted in the US and an Israeli industrial firm. In both samples, negative mood predisposition was negatively associated with performance ratings of ratees, whereas positive mood predisposition was unrelated to performance ratings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-378
JournalJournal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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