Quantitative magnetic resonance: A rapid, noninvasive body composition analysis technique for live and salvaged bats

Liam P. McGuire, Christopher G. Guglielmo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) is a new technology for measuring body composition of live, nonanesthetized animals (fat mass, lean mass, and total body water) in 4 min or less. We conducted a validation study to compare QMR body composition analysis of 3 species of bats (mass range 5.77-31.30 g) with traditional chemical extraction. In addition to scans of live animals, we tested the effectiveness of QMR for salvaged specimens (bats killed by wind turbines) and the effects of carcass temperature. Our analysis indicates that QMR body composition analysis is effective for live and salvaged animals. Frozen carcasses could not be analyzed, but results were not dramatically affected for specimens at 4°C and 37°C. QMR analysis eliminates the need to euthanize animals to determine body composition precisely, allows rapid and efficient data collection, and makes it possible to follow individuals longitudinally through time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1375-1380
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Mammalogy
Volume91
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 16 2010

Keywords

  • bats
  • body composition
  • fat stores
  • lean mass
  • noninvasive technique
  • quantitative magnetic resonance

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