Quantifying hole quality through geometry accuracy and surface qualities in rotary ultrasonic machining of carbon fiber–reinforced plastic composites

Dongzhe Zhang, Hui Wang, Weilong Cong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Rotary ultrasonic machining has been approved as an effective and efficient hole making process for carbon fiber–reinforced plastic composites. Hole quality plays an important role in assembling carbon fiber–reinforced plastic components and can be affected by the carbon fiber reinforcement structures. In this study, experiments are conducted to assess hole quality in carbon fiber–reinforced plastic composites with three carbon fiber reinforcement structures under different combinations of machining variables. Hole quality is quantified through geometrical accuracy (perpendicularity, cylindricity, and hole diameter) and surface qualities (delamination and surface roughness). Results show that the highest level of interlacement among yarn of plain woven structure induce the highest level of compression to the workpiece and the largest amount of additional material removal, leading to the largest perpendicularity and hole diameter. The worst fabric integrity of unidirectional structure generates the largest amount of non-uniform material removal on the machined surface, resulting in the largest cylindricity. It is also found that compared with woven structures, unidirectional structure is more likely to induce push-out delamination due to its smaller critical energy release rate. The lowest constancy of the fabric in twill woven structure leads to the largest surface roughness.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAdvances in Mechanical Engineering
Volume12
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Rotary ultrasonic machining
  • carbon fiber–reinforced plastic
  • hole quality
  • machining variable
  • reinforcement structure

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