Provenance experiments with baldcypress, Live Oak, and sycamore illustrate the potential for selecting more sustainable Urban Trees

Michael A. Arnold, Donita L. Bryan, Raul I. Cabrera, Geoffrey C. Denny, Jason J. Griffin, Jeffery K. Iles, Andrew R. King, Gary W. Knox, Leonardo Lombardini, Garry V. McDonald, Cynthia B. McKenney, D. Thayne Montague, Genhua Niu, H. Brent Pemberton, Adam L. Purnell, Larry J. Shoemake, Daniel K. Struve, W. Todd Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Ecotypic, clonal, and racial variation present in tree species across their native ranges represent a largely untapped opportunity to select superior seed sources or clonal materials to withstand a variety of unique environmental stresses imposed in built environments and managed landscapes. This paper focuses on three important woody plant genera (Quercus L., Platanus L., and Taxodium Rich.) and researchers' efforts to discover superior genotypes with tolerances to environmental stresses, including alkaline soil conditions, moisture deficits, and temperature extremes. The study authors are also interested in exploiting geographic provenances and open-pollinated family selection to identify unique genotypes or populations having desirable ornamental attributes, rapid root regeneration potential, and/or desirable plant architecture. A discussion of current results, potential impacts on selection of urban forest trees for managed landscapes, and plans for future development and research are presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-213
Number of pages9
JournalArboriculture and Urban Forestry
Volume38
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Keywords

  • Built Environments
  • Managed Landscapes
  • Platanus occidentalis
  • Quercus fusiformis
  • Quercus virginiana
  • Seed Source
  • Taxodium distichum
  • Urban Trees

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