Profiles of mindfulness and difficulties in emotion regulation and links to work–family–school conflict

Hanna Suh, Shin Ye Kim, Eleanor A. McCabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: We explored latent profiles based on mindfulness and difficulties in emotion regulation scores, and investigated each profiles’ relations to work–family–school conflict (WFSC). Participants: A total of 194 first year college students (64.4% women) participated in this study. Methods: Latent profile analysis was utilized. Results: Three profiles emerged, characterized as the “healthy” profile (57.5%), the “observant yet judgmental” profile (33.3%) and the “unhealthy without strategies” profile (9.2%). The “healthy” profile showed (a) significantly lower scores on all conflict domains compared to the “observant yet judgmental” profile, and (b) significantly lower scores on all behavior-based conflicts regardless of the domains, compared to the “unhealthy without strategies” profile. The difference between the “observant yet judgmental” profile and “unhealthy without strategies” profile appeared in family-school time. Results indicate that mindfulness and healthy emotion regulation capacity function as protective factors to WFSC. Conclusions: Our findings hold strength in explicating profiles that would otherwise have not been detected when exploring mindfulness and difficulties in emotion regulation independently.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of American College Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Mindfulness
  • difficulties in emotion regulation
  • first-year college students
  • latent profile analysis
  • work-family-school conflict

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