Predictors for the Number of Warning Information Sources during Tornadoes

Zhen Cong, Jianjun Luo, Daan Liang, Ali Nejat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

People may receive tornado warnings from multiple information sources, but little is known about factors that affect the number of warning information sources (WISs). This study examined predictors for the number of WISs with a telephone survey on randomly sampled residents in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and Joplin, Missouri, approximately 1 year after both cities were struck by violent tornadoes (EF4 and EF5) in 2011. The survey included 1006 finished interviews and the working sample included 903 respondents. Poisson regression and Zero-Inflated Poisson regression showed that older age and having an emergency plan predicted more WISs in both cities. Education, marital status, and gender affected the possibilities of receiving warnings and the number of WISs either in Joplin or in Tuscaloosa. The findings suggest that social disparity affects the access to warnings not only with respect to the likelihood of receiving any warnings but also with respect to the number of WISs. In addition, historical and social contexts are important for examining predictors for the number of WISs. We recommend that the number of WISs should be regarded as an important measure to evaluate access to warnings in addition to the likelihood of receiving warnings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168-172
Number of pages5
JournalDisaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Keywords

  • Joplin
  • Tuscaloosa
  • disasters
  • tornadoes
  • warning information sources

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