Predicting adolescent eating and activity behaviors: The role of social norms and personal agency

Christina Wood Baker, Todd D. Little, Kelly D. Brownell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

140 Scopus citations

Abstract

Guided by the theory of planned behavior, this 2-week longitudinal study examined health behaviors in a sample of 279 adolescents. Social norms and perceived behavioral control (PBC) were tested as predictors of self-reported intentions and behaviors in 2 domains, eating and physical activity. Differentiating, as opposed to aggregating, parent and peer norms provided unique information. For PBC, the authors distinguished global causality beliefs from self-related agency beliefs and intraself (effort, ability) from extraself (parents, teachers) means. Intraself agency beliefs strongly predicted healthy intentions, whereas intraself causality beliefs had a negative influence. Patterns differed somewhat across behaviors and gender. Results highlight theoretical issues and provide potential targets for research on health promotion programs for youth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-198
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2003

Keywords

  • Activity
  • Adolescent
  • Eating
  • Obesity
  • Theory of planned behavior

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Predicting adolescent eating and activity behaviors: The role of social norms and personal agency'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this