Post-exercise aortic hemodynamic responses to low-intensity resistance exercise with and without vascular occlusion

A. Figueroa, F. Vicil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

High-intensity resistance exercise may acutely increase arterial stiffness. Vascular occlusion (VO) acutely decreases arterial stiffness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate acute aortic hemodynamic responses to low-intensity resistance exercise (LIRE) with slow eccentric movement with and without VO. Twenty-three young healthy subjects (12 women and 11 men) were randomized into three trials: seated control (CON), LIRE (six sets at 40% one repetition maximum), and LIRE with VO. Vascular measurements were assessed before, immediately (post1), and 30min after (post30) each trial. There were significant (P<0.05) time effects and trial-by-time interactions such that the changes were greater after the LIRE trials compared with CON. Aortic blood pressure [systolic (~10mmHg) and diastolic (~5mmHg)], heart rate (~23b.p.m.), and the first (~10mmHg) and second systolic peak (~9mmHg) increased, whereas time to reflection decreased (~15ms) at post1. All measurements returned to baseline at post30, except aortic augmentation index (AIx), which decreased ~5% after the LIRE trials compared with CON. Increases in cardiovascular variables immediately after the LIRE trials were mild and short lasting. Our results indicate that LIRE acutely decreases AIx 30min after exercise cessation. The use of moderate intermittent VO during LIRE does not produce additional post-exercise vascular effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)431-436
Number of pages6
JournalScandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Keywords

  • Acute resistance exercise
  • Aortic blood pressure
  • Augmentation index
  • Vascular occlusion
  • Wave reflection

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