Policy Design and Achieving Social Outcomes: A Comparative Analysis of Social Enterprise Policy

Donwe Choi, Frances Stokes Berry, Adela Ghadimi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article compares American, British, and Korean social enterprise policies to explore how government policy design shapes social enterprises and how “social benefit” and “public value” are defined. A social enterprise is defined as the legally structured organizational pursuit of blending social purpose and economic profit through business activities, and examples from each country are presented. Applying Bozeman's publicness theory, the authors demonstrate the wide range of roles that governments play in shaping social enterprises' ownership, funding, and control across the three countries using regulations, subsidies, and procurement policies. These roles may affect the impact of social enterprises in society. The case studies show that the U.S. approach to social enterprise policy is heavily market oriented, while the United Kingdom is in the middle of the market‐to‐publicness continuum, and South Korea is much closer to the publicness (government‐dominated) end of the continuu
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)494-505
JournalPublic Administration Review
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

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