Pilot study: Survey tools for assessing parenting stylesand family contributors to the development of obesity in Arab children ages 6 to 12 years

Suzan H. Tami, Debra B. Reed, Elizabeth Trejos, Mallory Boylan, Shu Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Our pilot study was conducted to test the reliability of the Caregiver's Feeding Styles Questionnaire (CFSQ) and the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity Assessment (FNPA) in a sample of Arab mothers. Design: Twenty-five Arab mothers completed the CFSQ, FNPA, and the Participant Background Survey for the first administration. After 1-2 weeks, participants completed the CFSQ and the FNPA for the second administration. The two administrations of the surveys allowed for test/retest reliability of the CFSQ and the FNPA and to measure the internal consistency of the two surveys. Results: Pearson's correlation between the first and second administrations or the 19- item scale (demandingness) and the 7-item scale (responsiveness) of the CFSQ were .95 and .86, respectively. As for the FNPA, Pearson's correlation was .80. The estimated reliabilities (Cronbach's alpha) of the CFSQ increased from .86 for the first administration to .93 for the second administration. However, the estimated reliabilities of the FNPA slightly increased from .58 for first administration to .59 for the second administration. Conclusion: In our pilot study of Arab mothers, the CFSQ and FNPA were shown to be promising in terms of reliability and content validity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)463-468
Number of pages6
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Keywords

  • Arab Mothers
  • Caregiver's Feeding Styles Questionnaire (CFSQ)
  • Childhood Obesity
  • Family Nutrition and Physical Activity Assessment (FNPA)
  • Nutrition
  • Parenting Style
  • Physical Activity
  • Pilot Study

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