Physical interpretation of the dominant POD mode for full-scale pressure fields

Xiaoning Gilliam, Douglas Smith

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

In this work, we describe the connection between the tributary area averaged pressure coefficient time-series and the time-series of the most dominant mode obtained from the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) technique. This most influential POD mode (or eigenvector) is the weighted function associated with the largest variabilities of the pressure field obtained from the orthogonality procedure using the "hyperplane of best fit." These largest variabilities may be caused by events such as near wall turbulence, coherent structures, or vortices of the pressure field. The tributary area averaged pressure coefficient time-series is computed using the area ratio of each pressure tap to the pressure field as a weighted function. As expected, the two time-series are highly correlated. The POD method yields a more concentrated energy for the pressure field, whereas the tributary area averaged method smears the concentrated energy through the entire pressure field. A comparison study was performed on the roof and wall of full-scale measurements collected at Texas Tech University Wind Engineering Research Field Laboratory (WERFL). In this study, various angles of attack (AOA) of the wind were also considered.

Original languageEnglish
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event10th Americas Conference on Wind Engineering, ACWE 2005 - Baton Rouge, LA, United States
Duration: May 31 2005Jun 4 2005

Conference

Conference10th Americas Conference on Wind Engineering, ACWE 2005
CountryUnited States
CityBaton Rouge, LA
Period05/31/0506/4/05

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Keywords

  • Low-rise
  • Pressure fields
  • Proper orthogonal decomposition
  • Roof
  • Tributary area
  • Wall

Cite this

Gilliam, X., & Smith, D. (2005). Physical interpretation of the dominant POD mode for full-scale pressure fields. Paper presented at 10th Americas Conference on Wind Engineering, ACWE 2005, Baton Rouge, LA, United States.