Phenotypic Characterization of Rambouillet Sheep Expressing the Callipyge Gene: III. Muscle Weights and Muscle Weight Distribution

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Paternal half-sibling Rambouillet ram lambs (n = 18) representing two muscle phenotypes were slaughtered at 54.5 kg to evaluate the effect of the callipyge gene on muscle mass. Lambs were produced from a sire that was heterozygous for the callipyge gene. Nineteen muscles were dissected from the right side of each carcass to evaluate muscle weights relative to carcass weight. Excised muscle mass was significantly higher (42%) for lambs exhibiting a callipyge muscle phenotype than for half-siblings. In the pelvic limb, all excised muscles except the peronius tertius were larger in lambs expressing the callipyge gene (P < .001). In the torso, the longissimus (P < .001), psoas major (P < .001), and psoas minor (P < .01) were larger in lambs with the callipyge phenotype. In the thoracic limb, the biceps brachii (P < .001), triceps brachii (P < .002), and extensor carpi radialis (P < .01) were larger in lambs with the callipyge phenotype. Total pelvic limb (P < .001), torso (P < .001), and thoracic muscle weights were higher (P < .01) in lambs with the callipyge phenotype. Callipyge lambs had a higher (P < .01) percentage of excised muscle weight in the pelvic limb and torso and a lower (P < .01) percentage in the thoracic limb when compared to controls. These data indicate that the magnitude of expression of the callipyge gene is dependent upon the location of the muscle on the body and that the increased muscle mass was concentrated in the leg and loin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-138
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume75
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1997

Keywords

  • Callipyge
  • Carcass Composition
  • Muscles
  • Sheep

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Phenotypic Characterization of Rambouillet Sheep Expressing the Callipyge Gene: III. Muscle Weights and Muscle Weight Distribution'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this