Phenotype screening for genetically determined age-onset disorders and increased longevity in ENU-mutagenized mice

Dabney K. Johnson, Eugene M. Rinchik, Naima Moustaid-Moussa, Darla R. Miller, Robert W. Williams, Edward J. Michaud, Monica M. Jablonski, Andrea Elberger, Kristen Hamre, Richard Smeyne, Elissa Chesler, Daniel Goldowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

With the goal of discovering genes that contribute to late-onset neurological and ocular disorders and also genes that extend the healthy life span in mammals, we are phenotyping mice carrying new mutations induced by the chemical N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). The phenotyping plan includes basic behavioral, neurohistological, and vision testing in sibling cohorts of mice aged to 18 months, and then evaluation for markers of growth trajectory and stress response in these same cohorts aged up to 28 months. Statistical outliers are identified by comparison to test results of similar aged cohorts, and potential mutants are recovered for re-aging to confirm heritability of the phenotype.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-90
Number of pages16
JournalAge
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Keywords

  • Age-onset
  • ENU mutations
  • Longevity
  • Neurological disorders
  • Phenotype-screening

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    Johnson, D. K., Rinchik, E. M., Moustaid-Moussa, N., Miller, D. R., Williams, R. W., Michaud, E. J., Jablonski, M. M., Elberger, A., Hamre, K., Smeyne, R., Chesler, E., & Goldowitz, D. (2005). Phenotype screening for genetically determined age-onset disorders and increased longevity in ENU-mutagenized mice. Age, 27(1), 75-90. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11357-005-4131-3