Performance, stress, workload, and coping profiles in 1st year medical students' interaction with the endoscopic/laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgical techniques

Martina I. Klein, Joel S. Warm, Michael A. Riley, Gerald Matthews, Krishnanath Gaitonde, James F. Donovan, Charles R. Doarn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

First-year medical students performed a simulated surgical task involving item transfers using a laparoscopic trainer box and the Intuitive Surgical's da Vinci® Surgical System. Performance efficiency in terms of the ratio of successfully transferred items to the sum of transferred items plus drops was greater when using the da Vinci than the laparoscopic system and task-induced stress measured by the Dundee Stress State Questionnaire was greater when working with the laparoscopic than with the da Vinci system. Perceived mental workload indexed by the Multiple Resources Questionnaire was high with both systems. With both systems, profiles of the information-processing resources involved in task performance emphasized manual, short-term memory, spatial, and visual/temporal processing dimensions. As measured by the Coping Inventory of Task Stress, task-focused coping was the dominant coping style used by the students with both surgical systems. The results have potential implications for selection and training with minimally invasive surgery procedures.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages885-889
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9781605606859
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Event52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Sep 22 2008Sep 26 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period09/22/0809/26/08

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