Perceptions of communication choice and usage among African American hearing parents: Afrocentric cultural implications for African American deaf and hard of hearing children

Valerie Borum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

IN A QUALITATIVE STUDY employing an exploratory design, the researcher explored the perceptions of communication choice and usage among 14 African American hearing parents of deaf and hard of hearing children. Semistructured, in-depth thematic interviews were used with a modified grounded-theory approach in which themes were analyzed and coded. Four thematic challenges and opportunities related to communication choice and usage were found: (a) oral tradition-nommo, (b) sign and oral-diunital, (c) literacy, and (d) racial/ethnic cultural socialization. Afrocentric implications for deaf and hard of hearing children are explored based on research observations pertaining to the significance of the oral tradition in African American culture and the socialization of African American deaf and hard of hearing children in the context of African American hearing families.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-15
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Annals of the Deaf
Volume157
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

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