Perceptions of a Speaker's Initial Credibility as a Function of Religious Involvement and Religious Disclosiveness

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Abstract

It is argued that religious attributes of a speaker should have bearing on audience reactions to the source. Analyses confirmed the assumption that religious involvement (defined as being a regular churchgoer) and religious disclosure (defined as being willing to openly express religious views in public) would enhance perceptions of a speaker's character. Furthermore religious disclosure but not religious involvement was found to be a significant contributor to perceived competence but considerably less so than manipulated expertise. No interaction effects obtained. However respondents' involvement on the speaker's topic also had significant effects on each measure of credibility parallel to the other main effects. Results are discussed in terms of a nbooster” effect for religious attributes of a speaker and implications are drawn to research on persuasion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-176
Number of pages8
JournalCommunication Research Reports
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1994

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