Pedagogical Efficiency of Melodic Contour Mapping Technology as it Relates to Vocal Timbre in Singers of Classical Music Repertoire

Kathryn Barnes-Burroughs, Edward E. Anderson, Thomas Hughes, William Y. Lan, Karl Dent, Sue Arnold, Gerald Dolter, Kathy McNeil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Summary: The purpose of this investigation was to ascertain the pedagogical viability of computer-generated melodic contour mapping systems in the classical singing studio, as perceived by their resulting effect (if any) on vocal timbre when a singer's head and neck remained in a normal singing posture. The evaluation of data gathered during the course of the study indicates that the development of consistent vocal timbre produced by the classical singing student may be enhanced through visual/kinesthetic response to melodic contour inversion mapping, as it balances the singer's perception of melodic intervals in standard musical notation. Unexpectedly, it was discovered that the system, in its natural melodic contour mode, may also be useful for teaching a student to sing a consistent legato line. The results of the study also suggest that the continued development of this new technology for the general teaching studio, designed to address standard musical notation and a singer's visual/kinesthetic response to it, may indeed be useful.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)689-698
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Voice
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007

Keywords

  • Classical voice
  • Legato
  • Mapping systems
  • Melodic contour
  • Notation
  • Pedagogy
  • Singing posture
  • Studio technology
  • Timbre
  • Tone quality
  • Visual/kinesthetic response

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