On the modeling of scaled measurement sequences: Implications for analyses of cognitive development

Todd D. Little, Keith F. Widaman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Contrary to Brainerd's (1978) argument that measurement sequences do not provide a useful representation of hypothesized developmental sequences, the basic utility of measurement sequences as indices of age-related changes in cognition is demonstrated. Specifically, a scalable measurement sequence provides ordinal data describing a developmental phenomenon of interest. Because of this basic quality, a theoretically derived and empirically scaled task sequence can be used in robust statistical analyses, such as multiple regression or structural modeling, that enable tests of hypothesized relationships among indices of cognitive development. A scaled sequence of number tasks is presented to illustrate this argument and to test hypotheses concerning the relationship between a Piagetian measure of numerical functional relations and psychometric measures of numerical and perceptual ability. A structural equation model adequately represented the relationships among the four latent variables of age, numerical facility, perceptual speed, and numerical functional relations, demonstrating the utility of measurement sequences as indices of development. Extensions of the proposed procedures are discussed that would provide powerful tests of important theoretical questions regarding more comprehensive representations of developmental processes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)457-479
Number of pages23
JournalIntelligence
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'On the modeling of scaled measurement sequences: Implications for analyses of cognitive development'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this