On the measurement of friction coefficient utilizing the ring compression test. II. Effects of deformation speed, strain rate and barreling

Hasan Sofuoglu, Jahan Rasty

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The main of this research was to investigate whether the friction calibration curves, which provide the magnitude of friction coefficient, available in the literature are valid for all types of materials and test conditions; i.e. are they independent of material properties, deformation speed, strain rate sensitivity, and barreling? In this research, a series of ring compression tests were conducted in order to determine the magnitude of friction coefficient (μ) as well as the corresponding calibration curve for two types of modeling materials, white and black plasticine. The experiments were first modeled using the Physical Modeling Technique and then simulated via an elastic-plastic finite element code ABAQUS. The effect of material properties on friction calibration curves was presented in part I of this paper. The effects of deformation speed, barreling, and strain rate sensitivity on the calibration curves were given in this paper. Contrary to the results available in the literature, where the same calibration curves are recommended for all types of materials and test conditions, the results of this investigation showed that friction calibration curves were affected by material properties and test conditions and every material possesses its own distinctive friction calibration curve.

Original languageEnglish
Pages189-197
Number of pages9
StatePublished - 1996
EventProceedings of the 1996 3rd Biennial Joint Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis, ESDA. Part 7 (of 9) - Montpellier, Fr
Duration: Jul 1 1996Jul 4 1996

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the 1996 3rd Biennial Joint Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis, ESDA. Part 7 (of 9)
CityMontpellier, Fr
Period07/1/9607/4/96

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