Offseason body composition changes detected by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry versus multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis in collegiate american football athletes

Jake R. Boykin, Grant M. Tinsley, Christine M. Harrison, Jessica Prather, Javier Zaragoza, Matthias Tinnin, Shay Smith, Camden Wilson, Lem W. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Tracking changes in body composition may provide key information about the effectiveness of training programs for athletes. This study reports on the agreement between bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for tracking body composition changes during a seven-week offseason training program in 29 NCAA collegiate American football players. Body composition in subjects (mean ± SD; age: 19.7 ± 1.5 y; height: 179.8 ± 6.6 cm; body mass (BM: 96.1 ± 12.6 kg; DXA body fat: 20.9 ± 4.4%) was estimated using BIA (InBody 770) and DXA (Hologic Horizon) before and after the training intervention. Repeated measures ANOVA and post hoc comparisons were performed. Longitudinal agreement between methods was also examined by concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) and Bland–Altman analysis alongside linear regression to identify bias. Significant method by time interactions were observed for BM (DXA: 1.1 ± 2.4 kg; BIA: 1.4 ± 2.5 kg; p < 0.03), arms fat-free mass (FFM) (DXA: 0.4 ± 0.5 kg; BIA: 0.2 ± 0.4 kg; p < 0.03), and legs FFM (DXA: 0.6 ± 1.1 kg; BIA: 0.1 ± 0.6 kg; p < 0.01). Post hoc comparisons indicated that DXA—but not BIA—detected increases in FFM of the arms and legs. Time main effects, but no method by time interactions, were observed for total FFM (DXA: 1.6 ± 1.9 kg; BIA: 1.2 ± 2.1 kg; p = 0.004) and trunk FFM (DXA: 0.7 ± 1.3 kg; BIA: 0.5 ± 1.0 kg; p = 0.02). Changes in total BM (CCC = 0.96), FFM (CCC = 0.49), and fat mass (CCC = 0.50) were significantly correlated between BIA and DXA. DXA and BIA may similarly track increases in whole-body FFM in American collegiate football players; however, BIA may possess less sensitivity in detecting segmental FFM increases, particularly in the appendages.

Original languageEnglish
Article number112
JournalSports
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • BIA
  • Body fat
  • Body fat percentage
  • DXA
  • Fat-free mass
  • Fat-free mass index

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