Offensiveness of Native American names, mascots and logos in sports: A survey of American Indian tribal leaders and the general population

F. Leveay, David Callison, Ann Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The pervasiveness of media coverage of sports teams with American Indian names and imagery has arguably supported stereotypical beliefs of those referenced. Past research investigating opinions of sports teams using American Indian themes has been inconsistent in findings and drawn criticism for lacking valid samples of Native Americans. Through a survey of National Congress of American Indians leaders (n = 208) and random US adults (n = 484), results reveal that Native Americans are more offended by sports teams employing American Indian imagery as well as more change supportive than is the general public. Investigation of how demographic characteristics influenced perceptions show that while age and education level have little influence, political party affiliation does affect opinions with those voting Democrat viewing the teams with American Indian names, logos, and mascots as most offensive and in need of change.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-99
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Communication
StatePublished - 2009

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