Next generation crosscutting themes: Factors that contribute to students' understandings of size and scale

Katherine Chesnutt, Melissa Gail Jones, Rebecca Hite, Emily Cayton, Megan Ennes, Elysa N. Corin, Gina Childers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the degree to which individual differences in students' (N = 232) concepts of size and scale are explained by factors such as students' innate sense of number, out-of-school science experiences, exposure to size and scale instruction, gender identities, and racial/ethnic identities. There is increasing emphasis being placed on the use of crosscutting concepts to promote deep learning in science. A multiple linear regression indicated students' racial/ethnic identities, experiences with scale outside of school, and exposure to size and scale instruction significantly added to the prediction model. Results from this study can both inform the movement toward incorporating crosscutting concepts into pedagogy as well as inform educators, administrators, and other stakeholders of the factors that may shape students' understanding of the cross-cutting concept of scale, proportion, and quantity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)876-900
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Research in Science Teaching
Volume55
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018

Keywords

  • crosscutting concepts
  • middle grades
  • scale

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