Naming the roman stars: Constellation etymologies in cicero's aratea and de natvra deorvm

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Abstract

Modern readings of Cicero's reception of Greek culture tend to reflect the way we frame the larger question of Roman reception of Greek culture. In the nineteenth century, and indeed well into the twentieth, when Hellenism was in the ascendant and Latin awarded a decidedly second place, Cicero was often read as a slavish copyist in thrall to the Greek classics. Recent work, however, has emphasized Cicero's sense of control over and entitlement to the cultural capital of this conquered province, and his manipulation of it in ways that position Rome (and himself) as a cultural and intellectual rival to Greece.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-171
Number of pages17
JournalClassical Quarterly
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

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