Multi-walled carbon nanotubes upregulate mitochondrial gene expression and trigger mitochondrial dysfunction in primary human bronchial epithelial cells.

Ryan J Snyder, Kirsten C Verhein, Heather Vellers, Adam B Burkholder, S H Randell, S Garantziotis, Steven R Kleeberger

Research output: Other contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Nanomaterials are a relatively new class of materials that acquire novel properties based on their reduced size. While these materials have widespread use in consumer products and industrial applications, the potential health risks associated with exposure to them remain to be fully characterized. Carbon nanotubes are among the most widely used nanomaterials and have high potential for human exposure by inhalation. These nanomaterials are known to penetrate the cell membrane and interact with intracellular molecules, resulting in a multitude of documented effects, including oxidative stress, genotoxicity, impaired metabolism, and apoptosis. While the capacity for carbon nanotubes to damage nuclear DNA has been established, the effect of exposure on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is relatively unexplored. In this study, we investigated the potential of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to impair mitochondrial gene expression and function in human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs). Prim
Original languageEnglish
PublisherTaylor & Francis Online
Volume13
StatePublished - Sep 3 2019

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