Microbiota of cow's milk; distinguishing healthy, sub-clinically and clinically diseased quarters

Georgios Oikonomou, Marcela Lucas Bicalho, Enoch Meira, Rodolfo Elke Rossi, Carla Foditsch, Vinicius Silva Machado, Andre Gustavo Vieira Teixeira, Carlos Santisteban, Ynte Hein Schukken, Rodrigo Carvalho Bicalho

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to use pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes to describe the microbial diversity of bovine milk samples derived from clinically unaffected quarters across a range of somatic cell counts (SCC) values or from clinical mastitis, culture negative quarters. The obtained microbiota profiles were used to distinguish healthy, subclinically and clinically affected quarters. Two dairy farms were used for the collection of milk samples. A total of 177 samples were used. Fifty samples derived from healthy, culture negative quarters with a SCC of less than 20,000 cells/ml (group 1); 34 samples derived from healthy, culture negative quarters, with a SCC ranging from 21,000 to 50,000 cells/ml (group 2); 26 samples derived from healthy, culture negative quarters with a SCC greater than 50,000 cells/ml (group 3); 34 samples derived from healthy, culture positive quarters, with a SCC greater than 400,000 (group 4, subclinical); and 33 samples derived from clinical mastitis, culture negative quarters (group 5, clinical). Bacterial DNA was isolated from these samples and the 16S rRNA genes were individually amplified and pyrosequenced. All samples analyzed revealed great microbial diversity. Four bacterial genera were present in every sample obtained from healthy quarters (Faecalibacterium spp., unclassified Lachnospiraceae, Propionibacterium spp. and Aeribacillus spp.). Discriminant analysis models showed that samples derived from healthy quarters were easily discriminated based on their microbiota profiles from samples derived from clinical mastitis, culture negative quarters; that was also the case for samples obtained from different farms. Staphylococcus spp. and Streptococcus spp. were among the most prevalent genera in all groups while a general multivariable linear model revealed that Sphingobacterium and Streptococcus prevalences were associated with increased 10 log SCC. Conversely, Nocardiodes and Paenibacillus were negatively correlated, and a higher percentage of the genera was associated with a lower 10 log SCC.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere85904
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 20 2014

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    Oikonomou, G., Bicalho, M. L., Meira, E., Rossi, R. E., Foditsch, C., Machado, V. S., Teixeira, A. G. V., Santisteban, C., Schukken, Y. H., & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). Microbiota of cow's milk; distinguishing healthy, sub-clinically and clinically diseased quarters. PloS one, 9(1), [e85904]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0085904