Mexican Americans in Higher Education: Cultural Adaptation and Marginalization as Predictors of College Persistence Intentions and Life Satisfaction

Lizette Ojeda, Linda G. Castillo, Rocío Rosales Meza, Brandy Piña-Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined how college persistence intentions and life satisfaction influenced by acculturation, enculturation, White marginalization, and Mexican American marginalization among 515 Mexican American college students. The utility of a path analysis model was supported. Enculturation positively predicted persistence and life satisfaction. Acculturation and White marginalization positively predicted persistence. Mexican American marginalization negatively predicted persistence and life satisfaction. The model explained 4% and 10% of the variance in college persistence intentions and life satisfaction, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-14
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Hispanic Higher Education
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Mexican Americans
  • academic persistence
  • acculturation
  • life satisfaction

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