Mental health professionals' suicide risk assessment and management practices: The impact of fear of suicide-related outcomes and comfort working with suicidal individuals

Jared Roush, Sarah Brown, Danielle Jahn, Sean Mitchell, Nathanael J. Taylor, Paul Quinnett, Richard Ries

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

© 2017 Hogrefe Publishing.Background: Approximately 20% of suicide decedents have had contact with a mental health professional within 1 month prior to their death, and the majority of mental health professionals have treated suicidal individuals. Despite limited evidence-based training, mental health professionals make important clinical decisions related to suicide risk assessment and management. Aims: The current study aimed to determine the frequency of suicide risk assessment and management practices and the association between fear of suicide-related outcomes or comfort working with suicidal individuals and adequacy of suicide risk management decisions among mental health professionals. Method: Mental health professionals completed self-report assessments of fear, comfort, and suicide risk assessment and management practices. Results: Approximately one third of mental health professionals did not ask every patient about current or previous suicidal thoughts or behaviors. Further
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-64
JournalDefault journal
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Mental health professionals' suicide risk assessment and management practices: The impact of fear of suicide-related outcomes and comfort working with suicidal individuals'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this