Mechanism of binding of prothioconazole to Mycosphaerella graminicola CYP51 differs from that of other azole antifungals

Josie E. Parker, Andrew G.S. Warrilow, Hans J. Cools, Claire M. Martel, W. David Nes, Bart A. Fraaije, John A. Lucas, Diane E. Kelly, Steven L. Kelly

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46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prothioconazole is one of the most important commercially available demethylase inhibitors (DMIs) used to treat Mycosphaerella graminicola infection of wheat, but specific information regarding its mode of action is not available in the scientific literature. Treatment of wild-type M. graminicola (strain IPO323) with 5 μg of epoxiconazole, tebuconazole, triadimenol, or prothioconazole ml-1 resulted in inhibition of M. graminicola CYP51 (MgCYP51), as evidenced by the accumulation of 14_-methylated sterol substrates (lanosterol and eburicol) and the depletion of ergosterol in azole-treated cells. Successful expression of MgCYP51 in Escherichia coli enabled us to conduct spectrophotometric assays using purified 62-kDa MgCYP51 protein. Antifungal-binding studies revealed that epoxiconazole, tebuconazole, and triadimenol all bound tightly to MgCYP51, producing strong type II difference spectra (peak at 423 to 429 nm and trough at 406 to 409 nm) indicative of the formation of classical low-spin sixth-ligand complexes. Interaction of prothioconazole with MgCYP51 exhibited a novel spectrum with a peak and trough observed at 410 nm and 428 nm, respectively, indicating a different mechanism of inhibition. Prothioconazole bound to MgCYP51 with 840-fold less affinity than epoxiconazole and, unlike epoxiconazole, tebuconazole, and triadimenol, which are noncompetitive inhibitors, prothioconazole was found to be a competitive inhibitor of substrate binding. This represents the first study to validate the effect of prothioconazole on the sterol composition of M. graminicola and the first on the successful heterologous expression of active MgCYP51 protein. The binding affinity studies documented here provide novel insights into the interaction of MgCYP51 with DMIs, especially for the new triazolinethione derivative prothioconazole.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1460-1465
Number of pages6
JournalApplied and environmental microbiology
Volume77
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

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    Parker, J. E., Warrilow, A. G. S., Cools, H. J., Martel, C. M., David Nes, W., Fraaije, B. A., Lucas, J. A., Kelly, D. E., & Kelly, S. L. (2011). Mechanism of binding of prothioconazole to Mycosphaerella graminicola CYP51 differs from that of other azole antifungals. Applied and environmental microbiology, 77(4), 1460-1465. https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01332-10