Mean ± standard deviation intake values for 1–<10-year-old South African children for application in the assessment of the inflammatory potential of their diets using the DII® method: Developmental research

Sonia Malczyk, Nelia P. Steyn, Johanna H. Nel, Gabriel Eksteen, Linda Drummond, Wilna Oldewage-Theron, Mieke Faber, Martha E. van Stuijvenberg, Marjanne Senekal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to develop a set of mean ± standard deviation (SD) intake values for South African (SA) children for 36 of the 45 food parameters included in the original Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®) tool. The SA food composition database contains 30 of the 45 food parameters included in the original DII®, and a supplementary database was developed for six of the food parameters not included in the SA database. The SA child mean ± SD intake of macronutrients, micronutrients and select flavonoids was calculated by age in years, using eight data sets from dietary surveys conducted in SA in the last three decades. A total sample of 5412 children was included in the calculation of the mean ± SD. The current study sample was determined to be representative of 1–<10-year-old children in SA, and the plausibility of the mean intake values was confirmed by being in line with age-appropriate recommendations. Furthermore, an increase in energy, macro-nutrient, and most micronutrient intakes with increase in age was evident. The generated mean ± SD values for SA children can be used for calculation of the inflammatory potential of the dietary intake of SA children in the age range of 1–<10-year-old children.

Original languageEnglish
Article number11
JournalNutrients
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2022

Keywords

  • Children 1–<10-years-old
  • Chronic low-grade inflammation
  • Dietary inflammatory index
  • Mean intake
  • NCDs
  • South Africa

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Mean ± standard deviation intake values for 1–<10-year-old South African children for application in the assessment of the inflammatory potential of their diets using the DII® method: Developmental research'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this