Maternal Buffering of Adolescent Dysregulation in Socially Appetitive Contexts: From Behavior to the Brain

Christina R. Rogers, Michael T. Perino, Eva H. Telzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adolescents are more susceptible to dysregulation in positive social contexts, compared to children. We investigated whether maternal presence would buffer these effects in adolescence. Fifty-four adolescents and children (age range = 8–17 years, Mage = 13.38 years) completed a social go-nogo task during an fMRI scan alone and in the presence of their mother. We found age-related patterns, such that older relative to younger youth displayed more disinhibition toward socially appetitive than socially aversive stimuli, which was buffered by maternal presence. Furthermore, with age, maternal buffering in socially appetitive contexts elicited heightened activation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and amygdala–medial prefrontal cortex connectivity. Findings underscore the importance of caregivers in promoting the neural regulation of their offspring during adolescence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-52
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Maternal Buffering of Adolescent Dysregulation in Socially Appetitive Contexts: From Behavior to the Brain'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this