Marination of turkey breast fillets to control the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and improve meat quality in deli loaves

C. D. Carroll, C. Z. Alvarado, M. M. Brashears, L. D. Thompson, J. Boyce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Turkey deli loaves were evaluated using organic marinades in the raw product to control the growth of Listeria monocytogenes (LM) and improve meat quality in the cooked product. Treatments included sodium tripolyphosphate (STP; 0.45%, control), sodium lactate (3%), sodium diacetate (0.25%), sodium citrate (0.75%), and sodium lactate (3%)/sodium diacetate (0.25%) combination, all containing 1.5% salt. Data collected in the 2 trials included pH; lightness, redness, and yellowness; bind ability; cooked meat moisture; oxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances); aerobic plate count (d 0 to 80); and sensory evaluation. Also, thirtytwo slices from each loaf were inoculated with a 103 cfu/mL surface inoculum streptomycin-resistant LM cocktail and analyzed for LM levels (d 0 to 77). The sodium lactate treatment was lower in pH (5.84) postmarination. Lactate, citrate, and the combination treatments had significantly lower lightness values; lactate, diacetate, and citrate had higher redness values; and lactate had lower yellowness values postmarination compared with premarination. Cook loss, moisture, and bind ability were higher in the STP treatment. Citrate and the combination treatments had lower thiobarbituric acid reactive substances on d 3, but there were no differences by d 15. Cohesiveness was significantly higher in the STP, lactate, and diacetate treatments, and turkey flavor was more intense in the combination treatment. The STP loaves had >106 cfu/cm2 aerobic plate count by 14 d, lactate by 20 d, citrate by 40 d, diacetate by 70 d, and lactate/diacetate by 74 d. Sodium diacetate, citrate, and lactate/diacetate all extended the lag phase of LM. Therefore, acidic marinades applied in the raw product do have a negative effect on some cooked product quality attributes but do improve shelf life and decrease LM growth by extending the lag phase through 21 d postmortem.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)150-155
Number of pages6
JournalPoultry science
Volume86
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Keywords

  • Deli loaf
  • Listeria monocytogenes
  • Marination
  • Meat quality
  • Turkey breast

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