Manipulations of sensory information: A test of the hypothesis of redundancy of knowledge of results

Craig A. Lane, Mark G. Fischman, Melanie A. Hart, T. Gilmour Reeve

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The hypothesis of redundancy in knowledge of results was examined by manipulating the amount and location of sensory information available to participants performing a coincident anticipation timing task. Either the last 8 lights or the last 16 lights of the visual display were visible to 48 participants. Following an acquisition phase, learning was tested over immediate (5-min.) and delayed (24-hr.) retention intervals. The main finding was that performance was better when knowledge of results was present, regardless of the amount of sensory information available; therefore, knowledge of results was not redundant information for learning this task.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1106-1112
Number of pages7
JournalPerceptual and Motor Skills
Volume91
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2000

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