Managing disaster risk associated with critical infrastructure systems: a system-level conceptual framework for research and policy guidance

Rachel A. Davidson, James Kendra, Bradley Ewing, Linda K. Nozick, Kate Starbird, Zachary Cox, Maggie Leon-Corwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper presents a new conceptual framework of the disaster risk of critical infrastructure systems in terms of societal impacts. Much research on infrastructure reliability focuses on specific issues related to the technical system or human coping. Focusing on the end goal of infrastructure services–societal functioning–this framework offers a new way to understand how those more focused research areas connect and the current thinking in each. Following an overview of the framework, each component is discussed in turn, including the initial buildout of physical systems; event occurrence; service interruptions; service provider response; user adaptations to preserve or create needed services; and the ending deficit in societal function. Possible uses of the framework include catalysing and guiding a systematic research agenda that could ultimately lead to a computational framework and stimulating discussion on resilience within utility and emergency management organisations and the larger community.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCivil Engineering and Environmental Systems
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Infrastructure systems
  • adaptations
  • electric power
  • societal impact
  • water

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