Longitudinal effects of Latino parent cultural stress, depressive symptoms, and family functioning on youth emotional well-being and health risk behaviors

Elma I Lorenzo-Blanco, A Mecca, J B Unger, A J Romero, J Szapocznik, Brandy Watson, M A Cano, B Zamboanga, L Baezconde-Garbanati, S Des Rosiers, D W Soto, J A Villamar, K M Lizzi, M Pattarroyo, S J Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

U.S. Latino parents can face cultural stressors in the form of acculturative stress, perceived discrimination, and a negative context of reception. It stands to reason that these cultural stressors may negatively impact Latino youth’s emotional well-being and health risk behaviors by increasing parents’ depressive symptoms and compromising the overall functioning of the family. To test this possibility, we analyzed data from a six-wave longitudinal study with 302 recently immigrated (<5 years in the United States) Latino parents (74% mothers, Mage = 41.09 years) and their adolescent children (47% female, Mage = 14.51 years). Results of a cross-lagged analysis indicated that parent cultural stress predicted greater parent depressive symptoms (and not vice versa). Both parent cultural stress and depressive symptoms, in turn, predicted lower parent-reported family functioning, which mediated the links from parent cultural stress and depressive symptoms to youth alcohol and cigarette use.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)981-996
JournalFamily Process
StatePublished - Oct 2017

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