Leap Motion- and Mouse-Based Target Selection: Productivity, Perceived Comfort and Fatigue, User Preference, and Perceived Usability

Keith S. Jones, Trevor J. McIntyre, Dennis J. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Remote pointing is an input method that involves in-air gesticulation. Target selection via Leap Motion-based remote pointing and mouse-based pointing were compared while addressing methodological limitations that were present in previous studies. Participants completed the ISO 9241-9 multidirectional tapping test for pointing device evaluation with a wide range of target size-distance combinations and a standardized arm posture. Dependent variables included movement time, errors, throughput, perceived comfort, perceived fatigue, user preference, and perceived usability. Leap Motion-based input led to (a) worse user productivity, (b) more finger, wrist, shoulder, and neck fatigue, (c) lower preference ratings, and (d) lower usability ratings than mouse-based input. The experiment (i) confirmed findings about remote pointing-related productivity and fatigue, and did so while controlling methodological limitations present in prior studies, (ii) revealed significant discomfort and fatigue despite the presence of an arm rest, and (iii) revealed new findings about preference and usability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)621-630
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Human-Computer Interaction
Volume36
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Leap Motion- and Mouse-Based Target Selection: Productivity, Perceived Comfort and Fatigue, User Preference, and Perceived Usability'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this