It’s not the model that doesn’t fit, it’s the controller! The role of cognitive skills in understanding the links between natural mapping, performance, and enjoyment of console video games

Ryan Rogers, Nicholas Bowman, Mary Beth Oliver

Research output: Other contribution

Abstract

This study examines differences in performance, frustration, and game ratings of individuals playing first-person shooter video games using two different controllers (motion controller and a traditional, push-button controller) in a within-subjects, randomized order design. Structural equation modeling was used to demonstrate that cognitive skills such as mental rotation ability and eye/hand coordination predicted performance for both controllers, but the motion control was significantly more frustrating. Moreover, increased performance was only related to game ratings for the traditional controller input. We interpret these data as evidence that, contrary to the assumption that motion controlled interfaces are more naturally mapped than traditional push-button controllers, the traditional controller was more naturally mapped as an interface for gameplay.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherComputers in Human Behavior
Volume49
StatePublished - 2015

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