It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a gender stereotype!: Longitudinal associations between viewing superhero programs in the media and gender stereotypes in preschool children

Sarah M Coyne, J R Linder, Eric Rasmussen, D A Nelson, K M Collier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although content analyses have found that superhero programs in the media portray strong gender stereotypes of masculinity, little research has examined the effects of viewing such programs. In the current study, 134 mothers of preschool children (from the Western and Northwestern United States) reported their child’s superhero exposure in the media, male-stereotyped play, weapon play, and parental active mediation of the media at two time points (1 year apart). Results revealed that boys viewed superhero programs more frequently than girls, with nearly a quarter of boys viewing superhero programs at least weekly. Analyses revealed that superhero exposure was related to higher levels of male-stereotyped play for boys and higher levels of weapon play for both boys and girls from Time 1 to Time 2, even after controlling for initial levels. Parental active mediation did not negate these effects, and even served to strengthen one finding for girls. Specifically, among girls with high supe
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)416-430
JournalSex Roles
StatePublished - May 8 2014

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