Is the Pencil Mightier than the Keyboard? A Meta-Analysis Comparing the Method of Notetaking Outcomes

Mike Allen, Luke LeFebvre, Leah LeFebvre, John Bourhis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    This meta-analysis compared the educational impact of the method of notetaking in the college classroom–hand written or using electronic device. The findings involved 14 studies combining 3,075 participants demonstrated that using electronic notetaking methods reduced measured outcomes (average r = −.142). Using the Binomial Effect Size Display, results indicated a decline of 25% of students scoring below the mean when electronic devices when compared to using handwritten notetaking. The study considers explanations for the decline and makes recommendations about the use of technology for notetaking in the classroom as well as paths for practical and pedagogical implications.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)143-154
    Number of pages12
    JournalSouthern Communication Journal
    Volume85
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - May 26 2020

    Keywords

    • Notetaking
    • distraction
    • handwriting
    • instructional strategies
    • laptop
    • retention

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