Investigating the primary orientations of learners of less commonly taught languages and the relationship between their target languages and major areas of study

Comfort Pratt, Alime Sadikova, Youngun Dan, Tianlan Wei, Amani Zaier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article reports on an investigation of the primary orientations of learners of less commonly taught languages and the relationship between their major areas of study and target languages. One hundred and eleven students enrolled in Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Russian, Turkish, and Uzbek courses in a West Texas university were surveyed. A descriptive analysis from SPSS indicated that the primary orientations were for the most part instrumental and language specific, with the most important factor overall being career benefits. A comparison of frequencies also revealed that there was an unequivocal relationship between major fields of study and target languages.
Original languageEnglish
JournalModern Language Journal
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

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