Intrusiveness of behavioral treatments for children with autism and developmental disabilities: An initial investigation

Michael R. Mayton, Stacy L. Carter, Jie Zhang, John J. Wheeler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The behaviors frequently displayed by students with autism can place them at risk for overly reactive behavior interventions with unwanted side effects. The current study examined the level of intrusiveness of behavioral treatments developed for 198 students with disabilities from 13 different states. Results demonstrated that students diagnosed with autism had proportionally more intrusive behavior interventions when compared to students in five other disability categories and indicated that many students with autism were unnecessarily subjected to highly intrusive behavior interventions. The implications of these findings are discussed, and recommendations for future research are provided.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-101
Number of pages10
JournalEducation and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities
Volume49
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 2014

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