Interpersonal Theory of Suicide Using a Familismo Values Lens among Emerging Mexican Descent Adults

Daisy Aceves, Brandy Piña-Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study examined the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide (IPT) within a culturally relevant framework by simultaneously examining familismo values to explain suicidal ideation among Mexican descent emerging adults. With a sample of 249 Mexican descent emerging adults (age range: 18–25 years; M = 19.17; SD = 1.53; 65.5% women), the present study found that there was a significant interaction between perceived burdensomeness (PB) and familismo-subjugation of self values. These findings provide evidence that in the context of perceiving one’s self as being a burden on the family, having higher familismo subjugation of self-values puts one at higher risk for suicidal ideation than if they have lower subjugation values. These findings highlight that when dissonance occurs between one’s values and their lived experience, a higher risk of suicidal ideation occurs for Mexican descent emerging adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-94
Number of pages15
JournalHispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
Volume43
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Latino
  • college students
  • familismo
  • suicidal ideation

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