Interparental agreement on the use of control in childrearing and infants' compliance to mother's control strategies

Eric W. Lindsey, Yvonne M. Caldera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined associations between interparental agreement about the use of control with children, maternal control strategies, and child compliance to mother in 55 two-parent families with 11- to 15-month-old infants (27 boys, 28 girls). Mothers and fathers reported on their beliefs about the use of control with children, and this data was used to create an interparental agreement score for each mother-father dyad. Mother's verbal control strategies and child responses to maternal control strategies were assessed at both 14- and 18 months during a 15-min home observation play session. Results revealed that mothers who believed in the use of strict control with children used more directives when interacting with their child. Mothers who used more directives to control their child at 14 months had children who were more defiant at 18 months. Parents who agreed about the use of control had children who were more compliant at 18 months.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-178
Number of pages14
JournalInfant Behavior and Development
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

Keywords

  • Child-rearing beliefs
  • Infant compliance
  • Interparental agreement

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Interparental agreement on the use of control in childrearing and infants' compliance to mother's control strategies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this